Low-energy usage makes new ‘blue lights’ special

Cornell electricians Jon Ryan, left, and Dave Pawelczyk assemble a new-style LED blue light prior to installing in a fixture.

Cornell electricians Jon Ryan, left, and Dave Pawelczyk assemble a new-style LED blue light prior to installing in a fixture.

To further promote energy conservation, Cornell has been switching all of its approximately 120 campus-safety “blue lights” this summer from energy-hogging incandescent to a light-emitting diode (LED) technology, which sips power at one-tenth the rate.

With incandescent technology – as ancient as inventor Thomas Edison – the metal halide bulbs enjoyed a typical lifespan of two years at best, and the bulb usually dimmed significantly the second year. LED technology is brighter and can be seen in daylight. In addition the new lights are easier to maintain and have a 100,000-hour lifespan.

“The new fixtures are expected to last over 10 years before needing maintenance, and the light level will be nearly ‘new’ the whole time,” said Lanny Joyce, director of energy management in Facilities Services. “Being that these light fixtures provide a beacon to safety phones directly connected to Cornell Police for any campus emergency, the added visibility and reliability the LED provides – along with the huge reduction in electricity usage – are quite amazing.

[Cornell Chronicle 2013-07-02] Read the whole article.



Category: News & Events

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