News roundup

In one ACSF-funded project, researchers will develop an accounting tool to assess the net climate benefits of land management plans that take into account the land's surface reflectivity, or “albedo” -- an important but complex climate effect that may counterbalance biofuels’ benefits.

In one ACSF-funded project, researchers will develop an accounting tool to assess the net climate benefits of land management plans that take into account the land’s surface reflectivity, or “albedo” — an important but complex climate effect that may counterbalance biofuels’ benefits.

Atkinson Center grants $1.2 million to sustainable ideas [Cornell Chronicle 2015-06-18] - Cornell’s Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future (ACSF) has given $1.2 million from its Academic Venture Fund to 11 new university projects selected from 37 proposals. This year marks the second straight year where more than $1 million has been granted. “We make seed grants to multidisciplinary teams with exciting ideas that address sustainability problems and opportunities. The process is very competitive and usually brings together faculty who have not previously worked together,” says Frank DiSalvo, Atkinson Center director and the John A. Newman Professor of Physical Science.

Cornell Tech to build first passive house residential high-rise [Cornell Chronicle 2015-06-17] - The first residential building on Cornell Tech’s Roosevelt Island campus will become the first high-rise residential building in the world built to passive house (PH) standards, a rigorous building standard for energy consumption. The building will become the beacon of the Cornell Tech campus and a symbol of the school’s commitment to sustainability. Construction is set to begin this month on the 26-story building; it will comprise 350 residential units and open as part of the campus’s first phase in 2017. “Constructing the first passive house residential high-rise in the world is the latest and most exciting example of our effort to set new benchmarks in sustainability and innovation,” said Cornell Tech Dean Dan Huttenlocher. “We hope this will serve as a model for how passive house standards can be brought to scale in the United States and create a new template for green design here in New York City.”

How will climate change affect gardening? [Ithaca Journal 2015-06-11] – Tips for Upstate New York gardeners to respond to a changing climage.

Polls produced by students reveal shifting attitudes [Cornell Chronicle 2015-06-18] -  According to a Cornell University poll, young adults are much more likely to report that they will be politically active over the next few years, compared with everyone over 25. This and related polls show that younger citizens are taking more liberal positions. More of them want action on climate change; most are accepting of gay marriage; and they consider alcohol a more dangerous drug than marijuana. When a question about climate change was preceded by “scientists have predicted irreversible changes to Earth’s climate by 2030…” a little more than 50 percent favored government action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. But when the year was changed to 2100 at least 60 percent got on board. The pollsters speculated that if the cutoff date was too soon, people would think that the government couldn’t do anything about it anyway.



Category: News & Events

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