Public Policy Capacity to Address Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation

Program or topic

Public Policy Capacity to Address Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation

Department(s) or unit(s)

  • Department of Natural Resources
  • Human Dimensions Research

Contact information

Richard C. Stedman
Director, Human Dimensions Research Unit
607.255.9729
rcs6@cornell.edu

Program goals

Improve the ability of governments to formulate effective climate change policies.

Brief description

The capacity of regional and national governments to engage issues related to climate change is of crucial importance as we scale up from the individual, to the community, to larger policy making bodies. However, public policy science has been critically under-empiricized with respect to climate change and related issues. Simply put, we talk a great deal about policy capacity, but have little idea how to know it when we see it. I have been engaged with Canadian colleagues in efforts to develop and test measures of policy capacity with respect to climate change. This work is ongoing, and comparative studies with United States policy regimes have been proposed.

For More Information:

Key Publications

  • Stedman, R.C., D.J. Davidson, and A.M. Wellstead. 2004. Risk and climate change: perceptions of key policy actors in Canada. Risk Analysis 24(5):1393-1404.
  • Wellstead, A.M. and R.C. Stedman. The Role of Climate Change Policy Work in Canada. 2012. Canadian Review of Political Science 6(1):117-124.
  • Wellstead, A., and R.C. Stedman. 2011. Climate change policy capacity at the Sub-National Government level. Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis 13(5): 461-478.
  • Wellstead, A.M., and R.C. Stedman. 2007. Coordinating future climate change policies across Canadian natural resources. Climate Policy 7:29-45.
  • Wellstead, A.M., D.J. Davidson, and R.C. Stedman. 2006. Assessing approaches to climate change-related policy formation in British Columbia‚Äôs forest sector: The case of the Mountain Pine Beetle epidemic. B.C. Journal of Ecosystems and Management 7(3):1-9.


Category: Government, Policy

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